Flair Combo: Lesson 29 & 97

This week marks the 98th lesson for Flair Bartending TV. Two more weeks and we’ll be at 100. Don’t go anywhere; things are going to start moving faster.

 

Flair Bartending Lesson 97: Tin Lift Off

This week’s lesson is my favorite kind: good bottle/tin working flair. These kinds of moves are practical for while you are at work behind the bar – you can do them with nearly any bottle filled to any level.

It can take some practice to get the double tin flip to land on the bottle but don’t give up. I still miss from time to time at work and when I do, it’s sometimes play it off like I meant to do that. I’ll grab another tin and “try” again, and this time I’ll completely miss it – like throw it over my shoulder or behind my back. I’ll tell my guests that “Third time’s a charm” – and then make sure I actually land it on the third time. Remember, flair bartending is about performance. Of course, the technical maneuvers are the basis for what we do – but don’t forget to have fun and let your personality shine through. Make it a show, regardless of your skill level. If you’ve ever seen really good street performers (or buskers as they’re known outside the US), oftentimes they don’t perform juggling moves that are too incredibly difficult – but they “sell it.” They hype it up. They put on a show. They involve their crowd. They let their personality shine through and you can tell they’re having fun, which is infectious. They only perform at 60-70% of their technical skill level – they need to make sure they land the moves 100% of the times, otherwise they have a hard time “selling it.”

Also remember, with that Flat Behind the Back part of the move, it’s really more of a lift and drop than it is a throw or toss.

Stay tuned to this site and my Facebook page for some big news coming next week. In the meantime, practice, practice!

 

Flair Lesson 96: Inverse Pour From Tin

This week’s move is an easy one – BUT it’s also a nice little flashy way to finish pouring nearly any drink. The Around the Head Grip Change I use in the video is simply the easiest method to get into the actual Inverse Pour From Tin but feel free to play around with it and find whatever lead-in works best for you.

Make sure you have your glass set up and iced.

 

Pour Cut #3

This week’s lesson is the 3rd in our recent series of Pour/Cut’s. The concept is the same as in the previous lessons, however the inverse grip of this week’s lesson makes for a nice twist. It helps to make sure you’ve already learned – or at least watched – the Pour Cut #1 and Pour Cut #2.

For starters, let’s talk about the grip on the bottle. For this move, we use what’s called an inverse grip, or sometimes “a juggler’s grip.” An easy way to get this grip is to simply pull the bottles out of the well this way; wrap your palm and fingers tightly around the neck of the bottle . Make sure you have dry hands! The last thing you want is the bottle to come flying out of your hand like a rocket ship.

Start the pour as close to the glass – or in it – as possible. This will help make sure you aren’t spilling. In case I haven’t mentioned this enough before: spilling at home is fun (go ahead and soak yourself like a dog on a beach), spilling at work is not allowed. Being a good ambassador of flair means performing moves at work that you are comfortable with, always giving great service, and avoiding spills at all costs, so that your boss, co-workers, and guests say things like “That was awesome – do that again!” rather than “Hey, maybe just make the drink and try not to spill everywhere this time.”

The “Cut” really comes from two motions: 1) the pivot of your wrist bringing the bottle from pointing down to pointing up, and 2) swiftly moving your arm down and across your body. Finding the sweet spot between these two movements – like shifting to 1st gear in a manual transmission – is really the trick to getting this move down. It may take a bit of practice before you can do it consistently so fill up a bottle of water at home, grab a pour spout and a tin, and practice this a lot. Actually, you can make a nice little drill/routine of practicing Pour Cut #1 and Pour Cut #2 back and forth.

Cuts are a flashy little way to finish making a drink. It’s perfect for very busy nights when you don’t have time to really flip bottle bottles but want to add just a little flash to pouring a drink – AND it’s the perfect ending to a good long routine, too.

You can probably do this with any pour spout, maybe, but I definitely prefer the Spill Stop 285-50s that we reviewed in a previous video.

 

Pour Cut #2: Flair Lesson 92

This week’s lesson is the inverse of last week’s lesson, so make sure you’ve already learned – or at least watched – the Pour Cut #1.

For starters, let’s talk about the grip on the bottle. Begin by grabbing the bottle around the neck and fan your fingers across the shoulders of the bottle as much as possible. This should give you a very solid grip on the bottle. Make sure you have dry hands! The last thing you want is the bottle to come flying out of your hand like a rocket ship.

Start the pour as close to the glass – or in it – as possible. This will help make sure you aren’t spilling. In case I haven’t mentioned this enough before: spilling at home is fun (go ahead and soak yourself like a dog on a beach), spilling at work is not allowed. Being a good ambassador of flair means performing moves at work that you are comfortable with, always giving great service, and avoiding spills at all costs, so that your boss, co-workers, and guests say things like “That was awesome – do that again!” rather than “Hey, maybe just make the drink and try not to spill everywhere this time.”

The “Cut” really comes from two motions: 1) the pivot of your wrist bringing the bottle from pointing down to pointing up, and 2) swiftly moving your arm down and across your body. Finding the sweet spot between these two movements – like shifting to 1st gear in a manual transmission – is really the trick to getting this move down. It may take a bit of practice before you can do it consistently so fill up a bottle of water at home, grab a pour spout and a tin, and practice this a lot. Actually, you can make a nice little drill/routine of practicing Pour Cut #1 and Pour Cut #2 back and forth.

Cuts are a flashy little way to finish making a drink. It’s perfect for very busy nights when you don’t have time to really flip bottle bottles but want to add just a little flash to pouring a drink – AND it’s the perfect ending to a good long routine, too.

You can probably do this with any pour spout, maybe, but I definitely prefer the Spill Stop 285-50s that we reviewed in a previous video.